This guide deals with TOP-5 best tempered glass PC cases available on the market, discussing the advantages and disadvantages. Learn what kind of light show functionalities these products have and how they differ from each other. The guide tells you about the pros and cons of using these products and offers an FAQ section containing answers to the most common questions asked by consumers.

Not that long ago, a lot of people were convinced that tower PCs were going to quickly become a thing of the past due to the prevalence of tablets, smartphones, smart TVs, cloud computing and incremental console upgrades. They called this the “post-PC world”. We should all be very grateful that this did not happen yet. Eventually, it will though that “post-PC world” will take a very different form than the one they predicted, most likely. For now, the tower PC is here to stay – we don’t want to game on tiny laptops, we don’t want to work on tablets or mobile phones.

The upgradability of tower PCs, which has been a mainstay of the concept since the original IBM PC of the mid 1980s, is also something nobody is in a grand hurry to leave behind. It’s never been easier, in fact, to build a custom PC than it is today. Gone are the days when you could easily assemble it wrong and actually fry components. There’s only one way these components will fit together, meaning anyone with a little patience can assemble a powerful PC these days.

The trick is choosing your components, and one of the components a lot of people overlook is the case. At one time, simple metal boxes were the mainstay, and nobody minded. They got the job done, and it was just what a computer looked like.

What You Will Learn From This Guide:

What Is a Tempered Glass PC Case, And How Does It Work?

Tempered glass is produced using a high-heat method which produces a very clear, uniform and durable type of glass. It’s very heavy, very scratch and crack-resistant, and doesn’t distort the light passing through it at all.

Tempered glass is easily cleaned, with simple window cleaner removing fingerprints and dust, and it doesn’t dent or warp like aluminum, steel or plastic cases of the past. It also doesn’t yellow, which a lot of old electronics have begun to do.

Aside from that, these PC cases don’t work any differently from any others, aside from one aspect – they tend to have lighting systems and even little statistical displays. This means some extra hookups are needed, but they’re no more complicated to connect than the hard drive(s), power supply, switch controls, USB leads, or anything else.

Types of Tempered Glass PC Cases

Like most tower cases since the turn of the century, these comply to three form factors: full, mid and mini. Most PCs that are between one and a half to two feet tall (which includes off the shelf gaming PCs of modern times) are mid-towers. Full towers are very tall, often up to three feet tall, and aren’t something you see in PCs that often unless someone plans on the machine being a server, and thus needing the space for a ton of drives.

Mini are compact, the type of form factor you see in smaller office or budget computers, that tend to be roughly the size of a game console. This form factor is commonly used for gaming PCs that don’t need big hard drives or a lot of extra hardware, and for media center or kitchen computers.

More likely than not, if you’re building a multi-purpose PC or gaming rig, you’ll be using a mid-sized tower and board. It’s the most common.

Things to Look for When Buying

When buying a case, there are several factors to consider, some more severe than others.

Obviously, you’ll want a style/design that meets your tastes. Many of these, the non-glass components are usually black, with varying uses of LED lighting. You’ll want one that can either have this lighting turned off (I never turn that on with mine), or produces a color(s) you are fond of.

A bigger concern is accommodation of parts you want to use. What size motherboard are you using, what size hard drive are you using, and how many? What kind of space does your graphics card need, what kind of cooling do you need? These all need space, and space in specific configurations, to fit properly. Also, be sure that if the tower has bells and whistles, that the drivers for it are compatible with the operating system and hardware configuration you plan to implement.

Airflow is critical – computers get hot, and perform better when kept cooler. While cooling systems do most of this work, they have to shed the heat they absorb somehow, and that’s done through airflow, as well as fans. Bear in mind how many fans, their sizes, and their configurations, and that they can ventilate and mount correctly.

How much noise do you mind? Fans make noise, hard drives (unless SSD) produce noise. Some towers can drown most of this out, a subtle hum being all you hear.

Finally, a last nod to size – there’s a minimum volume your hardware will need (remember the case types we looked at), but different tower designs can add additional bulk, so bear in mind the space a tower can take up.

My Personal Experience

As far as I go, I’m not a great example when it comes to aesthetic concerns with these. I’m the sort that doesn’t really even bother to decorate my living environment, because I’m always staring at screens when awake.

Until recently, I’ve always built my computers, at least since around 1990 – the last off the shelf computer I bought was my Amiga A1200 in the late 80s. I’ve always just bout simple steel/aluminum black boxes, and left it at that, even in modern times. These cases aren’t pretty, and they’re susceptible to damage, but I’m careful, and their aesthetic honestly just never mattered much to me.

However, very recently, as my old computer was damaged by the airline when I moved back to Florida last year, I found myself needing to replace it in a hurry. Due to the whole bitcoin mining nonsense driving the price of GPUs and RAM sky high, it was cheaper to buy a high-end gaming rig, than build the machine myself. My, times have changed. 

Well, when I brought the machine home, much to my surprise, it had this really artistic case with LED lighting along the front and inside the case, and this heavy as heck glass panel on the side. I have to confess, the LED lights do in fact look neat, but I find them a bit distracting, and since I tend to enjoy minimal lighting in my environment as a whole, I just turn it off most of the time.

However, I have grown fond of the glass panel – I can see what’s going on inside the computer without dismantling it, and it’s so much easier to clean. My niece, who had dented the case of my last computer during her family’s visit, couldn’t put a scratch on it, either. So, I do have to admit, tempered glass and modern case designs have their benefits, even if aesthetic value of a tower matters as little as it does to me.

One thing I have to say though, is to be careful, those panels are very heavy, and if you drop them, they will break – I had to get a replacement panel the third day I had it because I forgot about that when I popped the machine open to add one of my hard drives. Oops!

TOP-5 Best Tempered Glass PC Cases

Read a review of TOP-5 best products within the price range from $60 to $200 that are commercially available. These models have lighting, RGB fans and a mid-tower case type. However, they differ in the number of lighting modes, with some providing only minimal lighting while in others items, the lights can be turned off, turned down, or configured in any number of ways.

Tempered Glass PC Case – Spacious Mid-Tower | Thermaltake V200

Spacious Mid-Tower Thermaltake V200: photo

This spacious tower is a nice compromise between open area for fans, ram and plug & play hardware, while providing great, protected mountings for up to five hard drives as well as multiple USB ports. It has a modern, tasteful look that doesn’t overdo the LEDs like some of them do, supporting 16 different RGB modes. It has a single tempered glass side panel, with brushed material facing and support for multiple fans (some pre-installed.

This is a simple, easy-to-install case with a neutral aesthetic most people will find quite pleasing and economic with space it occupies as well as space it offers.

Features

  • Lighting: Yes, 16 RGB modes for 3 120mm fans.
  • Drive Bays: 3 2.5”, 2 3.5”.
  • PSU Cover: Yes.
  • Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX.
  • Case Type: Mid-Tower

Performance

This is a modern take on the classic tower, with the major modification in form factor being a housing for drive bays and power supply. It’s very open, and while I’d say the fans being lit is a bit excessive, it does look pretty neat. Most gaming rigs or multi-use PCs would fit well in this case, and its interfaces are very easy to cleanly put together.

It has great air flow through the top and out the back too, meaning the computer can breathe well.

Pros Cons
  • Lots of space.
  • Lighting isn’t that excessive. 
  • Lighting has 16 modes. 
  • Panel is solid, and mounts easily. 
  • Room for five drives total.
  • Drives in the drive bay are fiddly to install sometimes.
  • Only two 3.5” drive bays – 2.5” are really for laptops, they’re kind of slow unless SSD. 
  • No CD/DVD/Blu-Ray drive, but the drivers are on a disc! Figure that one out.

Conclusion 

This is very similar to mine, though it goes a little crazier with the lights. While it has its moments where it can be fiddly, it’s a solid case that doesn’t go out of its way to make a spectacle out of itself, but still looks nice. I honestly would appreciate the range of RGB it could do more, if I weren’t color blind.

Thermaltake V200: Check the current price

Black Tempered Glass PC Case – Unique Mostly-Glass Design | CORSAIR Crystal 570X

Black Tempered Glass PC Case CORSAIR Crystal 570X: photo

I honestly really like the idea of this one. Most of the outer casing is glass paneling, aside from the rear. This means it’s easy to clean, and easy to see where everything is, without it being overstated. I like that the only lighting it automatically bothers with Is tie 3 RGB fans it comes with.

It’s very open-ended inside, meaning that while it seems to only have two 3.5” bays by default, you could sneak extra drives in by mounting them. Bottom line, Corsair only puts their names on high-end products, so you know you can expect at least a certain quality and durability from something wearing their brand.

Features

  • Lighting: Yes, 3 RGB fans.
  • Drive Bays: 2 2.5”, 2 3.5”.
  • PSU Cover: Yes.
  • Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX.
  • Case Type: Mid-Tower

Performance

As someone who’s not particularly interested in lighting my case (though I get why others are), this is a case I can really get behind myself. It’s tasteful, it’s simple, and it’s made of a solid material throughout. You can fit a lot in it, it’s more open-ended internally, than a lot of modern cases, so it doesn’t pigeonhole your hardware choices nearly as much.

Pros Cons
  •  Lots of space.
  • Lighting is minimal, but more can be added.
  • All glass paneling.
  • Drives in the drive bay mount vertically, which isn’t a fantastic idea for platter drives.
  • Only two 3.5” drive bays – 2.5” are really for laptops, they’re kind of slow unless SSD.
  • No CD/DVD/Blu-Ray drive. People still need these for now …

Conclusion 

I’m not wild about vertically mounting drives that have moving parts, as it can grind the motor down a bit faster in some cases, and the absolute lack space for optical drives in modern cases, across the board, irritates me – that’s not obsolete quite yet, no matter how much people want it to be. The fact every driver ever is still put on CDs (including with computers that have no optical drive) attests to this. But, since that’s just how every case is now, it can’t be held against this model specifically. I like this case, and I’d call it one of my two favorites of the ones on this list.

CORSAIR Crystal 570X: Check the current price

Gaming Tempered Glass PC Case – Light Show for Gamers | ROSEWILL ATX Mid Tower

Gaming Tempered Glass PC Case – ROSEWILL ATX Mid Tower: photo

I like the form factor of this case and how minimalist the lighting is in and of itself, and Rosewill, while not as prestigious as Thermaltake or Corsair, is still a company with a lot of credibility in this industry, parts from whom I have used in many PCs over the past 20 or so years.

This one’s biggest selling point is the Aura Sync/Mystic Light feature, which can be used to sync with multimedia such as sound.

Features

  • Lighting: Yes, RGB Fans, Aura Sync/Mystic Light ready.
  • Drive Bays: Removable one-size-fits-all bay system.
  • PSU Cover: No.
  • Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX.
  • Case Type: Mid-Tower

Performance

As a case, I like the simple mostly black box look of this, and the fact that the lights are tastefully placed. This is the closest a modern case comes to the style of diminutive black box I was always fond of using.

People heavy into visualization and unique performance will enjoy the light sync compatibility of the fans, but to be honest, that would drive some people crazy within a matter of minutes. If you don’t like your Christmas lights to blink, you won’t like Aura Sync/Mystic Lights.

Pros Cons
  • Lots of space.
  • Lighting is minimal, but more can be added.
  • Aura Sync/Mystic Light (if you like blinky lights).
  • No CD/DVD/Blu-Ray drive. This really needs to still be offered for another 10 years.

Conclusion 

This is my other favorite, though the light show functionality would not be something I’d personally use. You don’t have to though, any and all lights can be turned off, turned down, or configured in any number of ways to be as extravagant or not present as you wish.

ROSEWILL ATX Mid Tower: Check the current price

Well-lit Budget Gaming Tempered Glass PC Case | MasterBox Pro 5

Budget Gaming Tempered Glass PC Case: photo

If you’re looking for a more affordable gaming rig with a tasteful design, excellent use of tempered glass, and lots of room for lighting and expansion, this is definitely worth a look. It looks like a triple-digit-priced lit glass case, but costs under $100. Surprisingly, it still has very solid build quality, and as lighting goes, this one does some nice work with its placement and illumination.

Features

  • Lighting: Yes, 3 120mm RGB fans.
  • Drive Bays: Removable one-size-fits-all bay system.
  • PSU Cover: Yes.
  • Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX. 
  • Case Type: Mid-Tower

Performance

I love how easy an installation would be with this case, as the PSU and drive bays are minimalistic and expandable. It is a spacious mid-tower with lots of room for expansion, so this PC can grow with you over the time you have it.

Honestly, as much as I’ve pointed out I myself am not hugely concerned with lighting, I would call the effect the smoked mirror glass of this case does, to be cool. It looks like plasma lighting, which combined with that smoked glass and beveled look, makes me think of the old futuristic designs of the 80s and 90s, which gives me that warm nostalgic feeling.

Pros Cons
  • Lots of space.
  • Even I love the lighting effect of this one – it’s unique.
    • Expandability that’s not seen in a lot of these.
  • Unique smoked glass looks modern yet future-retro at the same time. I like it.
  • Cooler Master cooling and ventilation design.
  • Affordable.
  • No CD/DVD/Blu-Ray drive. This remain a con until at least 2025.

Conclusion 

If I were more concerned with aesthetics of my case than I personally am, this would be my favorite one. It looks really unique, and has a feel to it that brings about a twinge of nostalgia I can’t quite quantify. It’s very affordable, very expandable, and will probably remain the only case whose lighting I genuinely appreciate, for some time to come.

MasterBox Pro 5: Check the current price

Nice Minimalist Gaming Tempered Glass PC Case | Phanteks

Minimalist Gaming Tempered Glass PC Case Phanteks: photo

This is the type of design most people think of when you hear “gaming rig”. It’s got a modern, angular, almost scifi-military look to it. This is what you expect to see next to a display where the latest FPS or racing game is being played.

There’s a reason for this – this is a very in-style case, with the basic accoutrements for multiple drives, basic LED lighting, a PSU cover and tempered glass on the side. A standard gaming rig fits nicely into this case.

Features

  • Lighting: Yes, front panel and interior.
  •  Drive Bays: Removable one-size-fits-all bay system.
  • PSU Cover: Yes.
  • Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX.
  • Case Type: Mid-Tower

Performance

This is the quintessential modern-day gaming rig case for those who want a contemporary design, but aren’t interested in something overly flashy or expensive-looking. I won’t lie, while I don’t concern myself that much with the look of my tower, as aesthetics go, I was never wild about the modern semi-militaristic look of modern electronics like this.

But, as I’ve said, for me, the look of a case isn’t that important as long as it’s not actively hideous, so I’d be fine with this case as functionality goes. It’s roomy, though I can see the way the PSU cover and drive bays are laid out, to be a bit annoying at times.

Pros Cons
  • Lots of space.
  • Affordable.
  • Very standard gaming rig.
  • Lighting is well-placed but moderate, a good compromise.
  • No CD/DVD/Blu-Ray drive. What happens when you need to reinstall Windows, and the restore partition on your drive doesn’t work? Have fun booting from a thumb drive – that works when it wants to, most of the time.

Conclusion 

This isn’t my favorite case on this list, but I won’t say it’s not a good case, as structural design goes. My PC’s case, which I didn’t pick out, does resemble this one, though the manufacturers of mine went nuts with the lights, and this one actually knows that often, less is more.

I’m happy recommending this as a standard, very flexible gaming rig case that won’t break the bank. 

Phanteks: Check the current price

Comparative Chart of Effectiveness of Tempered Glass PC Cases

Product Features

Thermaltake V200

• Lighting: Yes, 16 RGB modes for 3 120mm fans.
• Drive Bays: 3 2.5”, 2 3.5”.
• PSU Cover: Yes.
• Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX.
• Case Type: Mid-Tower

Effectiveness: 8

CORSAIR Crystal 570X

• Lighting: Yes, 3 RGB fans.
• Drive Bays: 2 2.5”, 2 3.5”.
• PSU Cover: Yes.
• Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX.
• Case Type: Mid-Tower

Effectiveness: 10

ROSEWILL ATX Mid Tower

• Lighting: Yes, RGB Fans, Aura Sync/Mystic Light ready.
• Drive Bays: Removable one-size-fits-all bay system.
• PSU Cover: No.
• Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX.
• Case Type: Mid-Tower

Effectiveness: 9

MasterBox Pro 5

• Lighting: Yes, 3 120mm RGB fans.
• Drive Bays: Removable one-size-fits-all bay system.
• PSU Cover: Yes.
• Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX.
• Case Type: Mid-Tower

Effectiveness: 10

Phanteks

• Lighting: Yes, front panel and interior.
• Drive Bays: Removable one-size-fits-all bay system.
• PSU Cover: Yes.
• Board Support: Mini ITX, Micro ATX, ATX.
• Case Type: Mid-Tower

Effectiveness: 8

FAQ 

How to clean a tempered glass PC case?
A soft rag, chamois or paper towel, and glass cleaner do the trick. Make sure the machine’s off if you do the interior side.

What’s the best tempered glass case with an optical drive?
I’d love to know the answer to this one myself. It seems like case manufacturers have a vendetta against optical despite including their drivers on a disc.

What’s the best tempered PC case for watercooling?
Honestly, any modern case works fine for this, as long as it’s mid tower or bigger.

What’s the best PC case with RGB?
I like Corsair’s minimalist take on it myself. It depends on how much you like RGB lighting. Being less than concerned with my case being a work of art, and being color blind, I feel less is more.

What’s the best budget PC case with tempered glass you can recommend?
I’d say the Masterbox. It’s the most affordable one on this list, and something about its aesthetic DOES speak to me, plus it actually works as a solid case.

Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Easy to see inside the machine without opening it.
  • Very durable.
  • Can create unique case aesthetics if you care about that.

Cons

  • Tempered glass is heavy.
  • If you drop it, it breaks.
  • Cases today lack optical drive bays, and for the life of me, I don’t get that.
  • RGB lighting is really in, and for a lot of computer people, who tend to be less interested in cases being “pretty”, it’s honestly a tad annoying when overdone.

Conclusion

I made no effort to hide that lighting and aesthetic are serious afterthoughts with me – this is true of computer people from my generation in general. But don’t let that fool you – these are pretty cases, the lighting is very tasteful, and these are all solid, functional cases. Tempered glass is great, and as time goes by, I am learning to like a little bit of lighting. I guess it’s growing on me.