Looking for the best surround sound headphones? Lucky for you, we’ve got you covered! In this guide, you’ll learn a little bit about how this technology works and things to look for when shopping. We’ve also reviewed the TOP 8 Best Surround Sound Headphones to help you make your gaming experience more real, or should we say surreal?

Nowadays, we have a lot of choices when it comes to headphones. There’s a very direct, causal reason for this, that being we have a tremendously increased need for them in the smart device age. Before, we really only used them for pocket radios/tape/cd players, and kids, of course, used them for their handheld gaming devices. While these were all prevalent, popular technologies, they saw limited durations of use in a day’s time, in favor of more engaging entertainments and responsibilities.

Thanks to the consistent use of internet-enabled smart devices throughout most of the day, the need for innovations in headphones – sound quality, portability, comfort – have skyrocketed as a result. Well, as far as sound goes, there seemed to have been a plateau for a long time – noise canceling, high-quality stereo sound with no loss or distortion seemed to be the final frontier.

Well, that’s changed in recent years, with the advent of advanced Bluetooth headphones with multi-channel surround sound. It sounds like surround would be impossible with headphones, given you need more than two speakers, with specific spacing for acoustics. But technology does some amazing things, doesn’t it?

How Surround Sound Headphones Work

Headphones achieve surround in one of two ways. Some of them actually have multiple embedded speakers, with specific ear-cushion shapes that create actual, localized multi-channel surround. The problem is, these are often very expensive, very delicate, and very bulky.

Others use some advanced virtualization for surround, mixed with specialized membrane chambers, which produce a very, very convincing effect. These aren’t perfect, and depending on the sound being sent through, it may actually be very obvious that it’s not real. This is less of a problem these days, given most audio is designed and encoded with virtual surround in mind – computers have this feature built into them, though it still requires the right speakers or headphones optimized for this kind of effect.

Additional features tend to be either advanced cord engineering or Bluetooth connectivity. With Bluetooth, you have to be wary of three things, though. Bluetooth, being a high-frequency wireless transmission, has a limited range. If you wander more than, at best 100 feet, it will often lose this sync. It’ll start to garble and break up well before that in most designs as well.

Another issue with Bluetooth is that it drains batteries, again due to this high frequency. High-frequency waveforms require a lot of energy to create and to decode. This means unless the built-in rechargeable batteries are very highly optimized, you may experience a fairly limited session length.

Finally, Bluetooth can be a bit fickle, when connecting to things like smartphones. I have a Bluetooth speaker (a rather posh one), which requires me to send the connection command from the phone, otherwise it just flat out doesn’t work. This is a common problem with Bluetooth devices, for reasons that I cannot begin to fathom.

What to Look for When Buying

Wired vs. Wireless:

First of all, while there’s nothing wrong with wireless headphones, don’t balk at something using a cord. Really, the only time wireless headphones are that advantageous is if you’re listening to something you can’t carry around or are afraid to carry your phone in your pocket for some reason. With corded headphones, you’re not feeding it batteries or recharging it all the time.

Microphones:

Second, while a microphone won’t hurt anything, you’re probably not going to need it with surround headphones unless you’re a content creator of some sort. In that case, though, you’re probably going to have a better, dedicated microphone instead. If it’s a mouthpiece, it would get in your way often as well.

Noise Cancelation:

This is something you absolutely want most of the time. There are cases where not hearing external noises could be dangerous – such as when out for a walk or riding a bike. Otherwise, this comes in handy, because you can drown out your noisy kids, barking dogs, or the din of multiple public conversations.

Comfort:

This is a big one. I for one don’t like the kinds of headphones that wrap around the outer ear or sit inside the ear canal (earbuds). They’re uncomfortable. Bulkier, padded headphones can cause you to sweat or your outer ear becomes irritated – that is, unless you’ve got nice headphones designed for comfort. Be sure to aim for ones that you don’t mind wearing for protracted periods of time.

Compatibility:

If you’re not doing Bluetooth, then you want 3.5mm. That’s the standard headphone jack you’ve lived your whole life seeing and using. Contrary to what the likes of Apple may think, this jack form factor isn’t going anywhere any time soon.

If you have this form factor, aside from some badly-designed iPhones, you’re going to be able to plug your headphones into any sound device made after the 1980s. If you go with USB, you’re stuck with rare devices that work with USB for sound. Most smartphones don’t. Most stereos don’t even do USB.

Adapters:

Of course, you can always consider an adapter that makes it possible to plug your headphones into questionably-engineered iPhones. This, unfortunately, occupies the charging port.

Sensitivity:

If you’re trying to virtualize your surround, and dynamically cancel noise, then you need high sensitivity, which creates better, shaped sound, and can adjust for random noises of varied decibels. Lower-sensitivity means poorer sound quality.

Weight:

Remember, the heavier these are, the more uncomfortable or tiring they can be to use. But, the tradeoff of higher weight is higher durability. So, you have to work out a balance that suits you, on comfort versus durability with this.

EQ and Impedance:

Honestly, you may want an EQ (equalizer) to adjust your surround for your own sense of hearing, but this is usually handled by drivers on the other device, or adjusts pretty smartly on its own. As for impedance, this really doesn’t matter in modern designs, due to a whole new way electrical circuitry works now.

I go through headphones like crazy myself

Let me tell you, I go through headphones like crazy myself. It’s why I won’t personally invest in fancy headphones most of the time. I do have a pair of nice Sony surround sound speakers, but I use them sparingly because the gods seemed to have bestowed upon me a curse that causes headphones to just randomly break with me.

But, let me tell you about a good friend of mine. She’s an older woman, in her early 70s, but she’s sharp as a tack and very spry. There are lots of those down here in Florida. She’s not afraid of technology, but she usually needs me to help her pick something out, and figure out how to use it. Fair enough, right?

Well, I took her to an electronics place a year ago, when she got her first tablet. She wanted to listen to music on it, in surround sound. But she wasn’t interested in buying a big surround system for the house, she just wanted to listen to the tablet. So, we went and looked at some nice headphones. She picked out this Bose set – and I told her Bose is actually overpriced when coming from a retail place. She paid three hundred dollars for those things.

Well, the darn things had a range of all of 20 feet, they never wanted to sync over Bluetooth to anything, and the batteries lasted I swear, minutes. So, she lent them to me, to use for a week, to see if I could get them to behave.

Lo and behold, my curse struck them, and I went to put them on, on day 2, and the things just came apart. Out of nowhere, they disintegrated.

So, my lesson to everyone is this – test the Bluetooth on these things before you commit to them (or go with something that can still use an audio cord), and make sure they’re durable, surely, I am not the only one with this curse. Finally, don’t overpay for these, no matter how amazing they seem. Just, wow.

TOP 8 SURROUND SOUND HEADPHONES

Logitcech G430 7.1 DTS Headphones – Best for Gamers

Logitcech G430 7.1 DTS Headphones: photo

I’d said that often, a microphone isn’t important – this isn’t the case if you do a lot of online gaming with voice enabled. If you’re going to listen to a bunch of twelve-year-olds fling angry, racially-insensitive slurs over a game of Call of Duty, you may as well do it with the best sound quality!

I kid, but in gaming, if you do use voice chat, you want the gaming audio experience as well as the communications to sound the best they can be. Logitech has been a big name in peripherals for a long time, and while headphones aren’t the thing they’re best known for, their audio stuff has been legendarily pretty good over the years.

Features

  • Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
  • Jack Type: 3.5mm
  • Compatibility: PC, Consoles
  • Form Factor: Over the ear.
  • Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
  • Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
  • Volume Control: Yes. And mic mute.
  • Equalizer: No.

Performance

This gaming headset provides a cinematic experience with compatibly-connected consoles (results vary here), and with PC/smartphones. The microphone on this one is very good, so if you want to do online gaming with voice chat, this microphone would serve you pretty well.

It’s not perfect though, as it can be a bit heavy, and it can make your ears sweat. It also has a bit of a decibel dissonance to it if you don’t adjust its levels just right on the source device end. Still, for gamers, this is a pretty sweet set.

Pros Cons
  • Great audio pick up.
  • Real surround with Dolby. 
  • Logitech engineering. 
  • Durable. 
  • Adjustable.
  • Can be a bit heavy.
  • Mic part can break if you’re not gentle – not rage-proof. 
  • Doesn’t breathe well. 
  • Cord is a little short.

Conclusion

I’m comfortable recommending this to dedicated online, competitive gamers. There are fancier ones for this, but this is the right price, for the right purpose. I’m not really comfortable recommending this one to non-gamers, or gamers who are wont to have rage fits when they’re 360 no-scoped though.

Logitcech G430: Check the current price

HyperX Cloud II Gaming Headset – Best for Streamers

HyperX Cloud II Gaming Headset: photo

While this is a gaming headset, I don’t feel like this is really for just average gamers, given the price and form factor. However, for someone who does Twitch streams or live podcasts, and doesn’t want a standing mic, this one’s quite good.

It’s comfortable with its padded headpiece and ear cups. With its pleated leather look, if you’re on camera, you’re going to look professional and natural. The adjustable boom mic is more malleable and easily adjusted for the best pick up, with no distortion or crunchy audio.

It’s also surprisingly an affordable alternative to a standing, expensive mic, though this headset isn’t cheap.

Features

  • Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
  • Jack Type: 3.5mm with a modular USB adapter.
  • Compatibility: PC, Consoles
  • Form Factor: Over the ear.
  • Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
  • Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
  • Volume Control: Yes. And mic mute.
  • Equalizer: Yes.

Performance

This one doesn’t quite have the sound crispness of others, though it does sound very good. However, the comfort and good look of this durable headset make it just the best one ever for Twitch streamers, live podcasters, and other such things.
You need good sound and decent production quality for such an endeavor, and this headset will do that for you. With the swivel nature of the actual speakers, it fits comfortably on most peoples’ heads without making their outer ears sore.

Pros Cons
  • Great audio pick up.
  • Real surround with Dolby. 
  • Pleated leather finish. 
  • Durable. 
  • Adjustable.
  • Mic can be fragile.
  • Cord is again a bit short. 
  • USB dongle isn’t that stable. 
  • Equalizer can malfunction from time to time. 
  • Doesn’t breathe that well if you’re in a hot recording space. 
  • Doesn’t like UV.

Conclusion

I just don’t feel comfortable recommending this to general gamers or audiophiles. But, for people who do live voice stuff for audiences, this is a good compromise, versus clunky headphones and a standing mic.

It’s no substitute for real studio equipment, but it’s pretty nice for those who just don’t have the budget for that starting out. If you want to livestream, then this might be just the right headset for you.

HyperX Cloud II: Check the current price

Corsair Void Pro RGB Wireless Headset – Best for Home Theatre Gaming

Corsair Void Pro RGB Wireless Headset: photo

I stand by that Logitech for most gamers, but this Corsair design, while a little odd looking, is quite nice for those who need a bigger reach for their headset, due to playing in a more home theatre styled setup. These sorts of setups aren’t just enjoyed by the super-rich anymore due to the technology behind nice entertainment setups being so affordable and commonplace all around.

If you want to sit back, a good distance from your devices, and enjoy online gaming without the cord in the way, this one will serve you well. One thing that’s nice about this one is the mesh finish, which makes it breathe nicely, and is a durable, comfortable material.

Features

  • Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
  • Jack Type: Bluetooth.
  • Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
  • Form Factor: Over the ear.
  • Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
  • Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
  • Volume Control: Yes. And mic mute.
  • Equalizer: No.

Performance

I’ve pointed out the problems with Bluetooth, but Corsair’s engineering with Bluetooth takes a page from their very solid work on RAM and other circuit components, which means it tends to cooperate so much better than many I’ve seen.

I don’t recommend using this as a live streaming headset, due to the mic being a lot less adjustable. The pick up is nice, but it’s more the sound with this one that you’ll see shine through. It’s comfortable, it breathes, and it’s probably one of the more dependable Bluetooth audio devices I’ve seen.

A note on Bluetooth with consoles – you can never be sure how well that’s going to work because there’s always some OEM aspect to console circuit and system design. So I am never comfortable promising, no matter how much Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo brag about Bluetooth in their machines, in saying for sure that Bluetooth devices will work with their stuff.

Pros Cons
  • Great audio pick up.
  • Real surround with Dolby. 
  • Mesh finish breathes nicely. 
  • Durable. 
  • Adjustable.
  • Bluetooth isn’t perfect, even if Corsair designs it.
  • Weird form factor may be uncomfortable for some people. 
  • Boom mic isn’t as adjustable. 
  • Power button is twitchy.

Conclusion

This headset is excellent for people who can’t depend on cord lengths, just be aware Bluetooth is a dodgy protocol, especially with consoles.

Corsair Void Pro: Check the current price

Razer Kraken Chroma Sound USB Gaming Headset – Best for Dedicated PC Gamers

Razer Kraken Chroma Sound USB Gaming Headset: photo

Again, I stand by the Logitech for most gamers, but those whom only game via PC and laptops may find this one nice, due to its compact mic design and its USB focus. It’s nicely padded, looks good, and has some of the better noise cancellation out there.

Features

  • Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
  • Jack Type: USB.
  • Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
  • Form Factor: Over the ear.
  • Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
  • Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
  • Volume Control: No.
  • Equalizer: No.

Performance

The one nice thing about USB sound devices like this is, 3.5mm jacks do break, and some PCs these days actually omit them, which baffles me a little less than with smartphones, but is still kind of absurd. However, it does mean you can provide more sound channels without needing specialized audio hardware in your machine – it can be handled by virtual multiplexing inside any system Windows 7 or older.

I can’t speak for Macs, given this is a gaming headset, and well, Apple doesn’t seem to know that video games exist. It should work well, though Apple’s relationship with audio has been a bit … rocky since around 2005.

Pros Cons
  • Great audio pick up.
  • Real surround with Dolby. 
  • Finish breathes well enough. 
  • USB does have its advantages if limiting devices it can work with. 
  • Slim mic is durable and can be nudged out of the way.
  • No controls.
  • Can have driver issues with some programs. 
  • USB can limit compatible devices. 
  • No option for actual 3.5mm. 
  • Is a bit fragile as far as the head brace goes.

Conclusion

If you are dedicated to PC gaming, and you want surround without specialized audio hardware, I am happy recommending it in that situation.

Razer Kraken Chroma: Check the current price

SteelSeries Arctis 5 RGB Illuminated Gaming Headset – Best for Portability

SteelSeries Arctis 5 Gaming Headset: photo

On top of looking snazzy, with its lit up detail, the retractable mic on this one makes it more durable for travel. Take this with you on road trips, to gaming parties, or just to game with HD audio on your smart device.

Features

  • Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
  • Jack Type: 3.5mm
  • Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
  • Form Factor: Over the ear.
  • Microphone: Yes, retractable.
  • Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
  • Volume Control: Yes.
  • Equalizer: No.

Performance

This one looks good and makes a statement. If you’re a competitive gamer, and you travel, this one will withstand the rigors.

Pros Cons
  • Real surround.
  • Durable, retractable mic. 
  • Breathes well. 
  • Looks snazzy.
  • The lighting really doesn’t serve a purpose and drains the battery.
  • It’s a little bulky for casual on-the-go use.

Conclusion

I feel like this is good for someone who wants to make a statement, or really cares about mobile gaming on the go, but maybe a bit overblown for other use.

SteelSeries Arctis 5: Check the current price

ASTRO Gaming A50 Wireless – Best for Developers

ASTRO Gaming A50 Wireless: photo

This one, with its own station, can be rigged to work with any sound source if you use a little ingenuity. But, I would call this the best one for developers, where the entire experience needs to be metered, and without being tethered.

You’ll want to test your stuff with multiple platforms, and you need to move around for some of these tests. This headset, with its comfortable foam earpieces, adjustable head support, and solid mic will serve you well as you test the audio and voice communications of your project.

It’s nice for competitive gamers too, though it’s a bit much for that.

Features

  • Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
  • Jack Type: Bluetooth with dock.
  • Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
  • Form Factor: Over the ear.
  • Microphone: Yes, retractable.
  • Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
  • Volume Control: Yes.
  • Equalizer: No.

Performance

Yeah, this one is great for developers, as a few of the indie ones I know are fond of this kind of configuration for that, and for their own hobby gaming. Holy crap, this one is expensive as I’ll get out though.

Probably a bit overpriced for average users (we talked about this). But, for people with a financially-invested interest in testing things under ideal conditions, have at it, this one works great for that. The modularity of the dock is something I’d like to see more wireless devices do – but more affordably, please!

Pros Cons
  • Real surround.
  • Durable, retractable mic. 
  • Breathes well.
  • Crazy expensive.
  • A bit fragile.

Conclusion

I only feel comfortable recommending this to developers and others with some venture funds to put into necessary equipment. It’s too expensive and overwrought for average users, and if you have my “headphones die when I touch them” curse, boy are you out a lot of money!

ASTRO Gaming A50: Check the current price

Sades Spirit Wolf Surround Stereo – Best Budget Gaming Headset

Sades Spirit Wolf Surround Stereo: photo

If you're looking for a budget alternative to the Logitech, this has a lot of the same accouterments, for a much nicer price. It’s USB, though, which means you may need a dongle for 3.5mm, and those often have issues.

Features

  • Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
  • Jack Type: USB.
  • Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
  • Form Factor: Over the ear.
  • Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
  • Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
  • Volume Control: Yes.
  • Equalizer: No.

Performance

If you want a budget equivalent of the Logitech, this one’s a good approximation. The sound quality isn’t as good, it’s limited to USB without a dongle, and the audio pickup isn’t as spectacular either. However, for the price, it’s a good compromise for sure.

I would call this one a bit flimsy though, as I actually know someone who’s gone through 3 of this model, and two of them were victims of a disaster known as felis domesticus. The other, he got frustrated during a match of some first-person shooter, and just kind of frustratedly dropped them, which managed to crack the microphone arm on them. He didn’t even throw them, just dropped them surreptitiously.

Pros Cons
  • Affordable.
  • Decent sound. 
  • Decent mic pickup. 
  • Comfortable.
  • USB only.
  • Kind of fragile. 
  • You get what you pay for; the sound and pick up aren’t on par with costlier offerings.

Conclusion

If you want decent sound on a budget, this one’s a great solution I am comfortable recommending on the condition you’re careful with it and find a good dongle to adapt it to other, more classical jacks. But, if you can afford something like the Logitech, go for that.

Sades Spirit Wolf: Check the current price

Sony MDR-DS6500 Wireless 3D Surround – Best for Audiophiles

Sony MDR-DS6500 Wireless 3D Surround: photo

If you just want an excellent-quality set of headphones for audio and cinematic experiences, Sony makes some really powerful offerings. I don’t, at all, like the price these go for, and it kind of goes against my warning to let people overcharge you for a simple technology.

Still, if you care enough about audio to spend hundreds of dollars, and don’t share my curse of headphones dying when you look at them sideways, then maybe you won’t mind so much.

Features

  • Surround Type: Sony 3D surround.
  • Jack Type: Wireless (with modular cord jack and dock).
  • Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
  • Form Factor: Over the ear.
  • Microphone: No.
  • Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
  • Volume Control: Yes.
  • Equalizer: No.

Performance

These sound fantastic, they’re comfortable, and the range on them is top notch. If you want the best possible sound you can get for your multimedia consumption (unless you want to online game), then these are by far your best choice – that is, if money is no price.

Pros Cons
  • Amazing 3D sound.
  • Great wireless range. 
  • Fantastic compatibility.
  • Iffy battery life.
  • Very expensive. 
  • A bit heavy.

Conclusion

If you can afford expensive headphones, and don’t mind the said expense, I can recommend these to you – they feel, sound and work fantastic for the most part. That price, though.

Sony MDR-DS6500: Check the current price

FAQ

Do surround sound headphones work with consoles (PS4, Xbox One, Switch, etc.)?
Yes and no. You’ll get sound out of them, but you’ll need to plug these into a surround sound system that can render the channels, to get true surround off a console. Bluetooth ones may work, but honestly, nobody knows how well they work, it hasn’t been well-tested. Don’t count on it!

How to Test Surround Sound Headphones?
This is actually simple. Find a CD, MP3 or video that’s marked as surround. Find one that’s the only stereo, that outputs only as stereo, to the headphones. Listen to the stereo one first, and then listen to the surround one. Does the latter sound theatrical, in a sense? Then your surround is indeed working!

Life Hacks

So, here are a couple life hacks I’ve found headphones rather helpful for. One it an “in a pinch” solution to a problem, the other is a little social engineering I use daily.

  1. My Microphone Broke! – The technology in microphones and speakers is literally the same, albeit they tend to be optimized and engineered to excel at one more than the other. The only difference on a basic level, though, is the direction of the current traveling through it. If you plug your headphones into the microphone port, you will be able to record sound. It may not sound fantastic, but in a pinch, it does indeed work.
  2. Leave Me Alone! – Ok so you may be like me, and be perfectly able to function socially, and capable of being amicable. But, you rather random people not come up to you and bother you with pointless small talk when out in public. Wear your headphones, even if you’re not listening to anything. Glance at your phone once in a while too. People will think you won’t hear them and don’t want to be bothered. Trust me, I do this all the time, and it never fails.

Comparative chart of 7.1 Surround Sound Headphones

Product Features Price

Logitcech G430

Logitcech G430 7.1 DTS Headphones min: photo

Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
Jack Type: 3.5mm
Compatibility: PC, Consoles
Form Factor: Over the ear.
Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
Volume Control: Yes. And mic mute.
Equalizer: No.
 

HyperX Cloud II

HyperX Cloud II Gaming Headset min: photo

Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
Jack Type: 3.5mm with a modular USB adapter.
Compatibility: PC, Consoles
Form Factor: Over the ear.
Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
Volume Control: Yes. And mic mute.
Equalizer: Yes.
 

Corsair Void Pro

Corsair Void Pro RGB Wireless Headset min: photo

Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
Jack Type: Bluetooth.
Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
Form Factor: Over the ear.
Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
Volume Control: Yes. And mic mute.
Equalizer: No.
 

Razer Kraken Chroma

Razer Kraken Chroma Sound USB Gaming Headset min: photo

Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
Jack Type: USB.
Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
Form Factor: Over the ear.
Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
Volume Control: No.
Equalizer: No.
 

SteelSeries Arctis 5

SteelSeries Arctis 5 Gaming Headset min: photo

Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
Jack Type: 3.5mm
Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
Form Factor: Over the ear.
Microphone: Yes, retractable.
Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
Volume Control: Yes.
Equalizer: No.
 

ASTRO Gaming A50

ASTRO Gaming A50 Wireless min: photo

Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
Jack Type: Bluetooth with dock.
Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
Form Factor: Over the ear.
Microphone: Yes, retractable.
Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
Volume Control: Yes.
Equalizer: No.
 

Sades Spirit Wolf

Sades Spirit Wolf Surround Stereo min: photo

Surround Type: Dolby 7.1/DTS.
Jack Type: USB.
Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
Form Factor: Over the ear.
Microphone: Yes, adjustable.
Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
Volume Control: Yes.
Equalizer: No.
 

Sony MDR-DS6500

Sony MDR-DS6500 Wireless 3D Surround min: photo

Surround Type: Sony 3D surround.
Jack Type: Wireless (with modular cord jack and dock).
Compatibility: PC, Consoles (Theoretically)
Form Factor: Over the ear.
Microphone: No.
Virtual or Real Surround: Real.
Volume Control: Yes.
Equalizer: No.
 

Conclusion

If you focus on comfort, convenience, and durability, and remember, the option to connect a cord is important, then you’ll find a nice, good-sounding pair of these headphones you’ll be happy with.

Just remember what we talked about earlier – durability is very important, and don’t let retail outlets gouge you for these, for crying out loud, there is never an excuse for these to be so expensive. Who knows, one of the ones on this list may defy my headphone curse, and actually stay intact for more than a month, because as I wrote this, my Sony surround headphones died on me. They lasted longer than any other headphones I ever had, but fate, it seems, is not without a sense of irony.