In this guide, you will learn about TOP-5 best racing drones, the most important features you should look for before buying a device and the main distinctions between the models. An illustrative chart of the most popular products will help you to make a comparison and choose the right model. An author of this guide, who has been following the development of drone technologies for years, will tell you how these devices have been evolving, what are their future applications and why flying these will be a big industry someday.

What You Will Learn From This Guide:

What Are Racing Drones?

Am I the only one who remembers back in the day, how sci-fi stuff always showed us random things flying about in the air? Robots and vehicles. Back to the Future 2 showed us a little one that even walked a dog.

Of course, the way these science fiction devices hovered and flew was always a mystery – some unexplained nonexistent scientific principle, commonly called “handwavium” in literary shorthand. Some mysterious force to produce anti-gravity, so far, doesn’t seem possible, at least not in a practical way.

Here’s the thing, things that still move like this, and are this size, evolved anyway, without us initially even noticing. We have hovering robots and the like now – they’re called drones.

They began their existence in the scientific and military worlds. They took the form of remote submersibles and remote controlled, compact aircraft. Neither of these had any consumer value, nor were they safe for consumers. To top it all off, they weren’t even affordable to consumers.

The miniaturization of electronics, improvement of batteries, and advances in materials made consumer drones possible in the 21st century. Already a culture used to the albeit expensive hobby of remote-controlled airplanes and helicopters, people just saw them as the next evolution of that. They weren’t entirely wrong, but it’s more than that.

Opening Up a World of Possibilities

The compact, maneuverable nature of these devices, and their ability to hover open up a world of possibilities. They’re basically all the sci-fi hovering robot helpers we used to pine for. Some of them are even small and safe enough to move around indoors, though these aren’t widely on the market yet.

We are staring down the barrel of a specific kind of future now. Not that long from now, perhaps a couple of decades at the longest, and drones will be delivering purchases, delivering food. They’ll patrol busy streets, they’ll be eyes on problems for first responders to be better prepared. They’ll help firefighters control blazes.

Yes, there will probably even be one that can walk a dog. If it has enough power to resist the pull of a dog the given size, it could control them.

People fear all of this, because what if the computers running these make mistakes? What if these computers are hacked? Well, precious few of them will be self-guided. Most of these devices will have pilots, and there will be regulations on their flight just like any other type of traffic. There’ll be routes they have to take, probably following street layouts for the most part, at a fixed set of altitudes.

The next generation of drones doesn’t even use spinning blades, but rather, a ring takes their place that, with air intake elsewhere, somehow creates quiet downward air thrust. I’m not entirely sure how that works, but it’s real and not far off.

Today, drones see their biggest applications in hobby fields, with racing being an up and coming competitive hobby. While a lot of futurists roll their eyes at such “childish” distractions for this technology, they gravely underestimate how useful this is.

The more entertainment value these have, the wider customer adoption and acceptance will be. It will be funded better as a tech sector, and those future applications will hit the world sooner. No, racing these is good – it drives their development further too.

How do Racing Drones Work?

These devices are compact remote-controlled aircraft. Their methods of lift and propulsion are unique, but their closest relative would be helicopters. Like helicopters, they have propeller assemblies that produce downward thrust, and ones that produce lateral thrust, letting them hover and move about smoothly.

These devices are built with hovering being less of a concern, though they still can, a bit awkwardly. Their whole thing is the rate of climb/descent and the rate of forward speed. They try to go faster than each other, hence race.

Drone races don’t cover the distance of a vehicle race, obviously, and air races are different anyhow. Many racers control these using a visor/goggle display system, something we’ve looked at before.

What are the Types and their Differences?

You can’t really classify these into a lot of unique categories, like with other technologies. This is because every company has its own unique design, but they all follow the same laws of physics, and so must, for now, all work pretty much the same way.

Drone Design

Their design overall does have some categories. Survey/aerial footage drones tend to be square in shape, with four propellers on the corners, the camera package mounted underneath. Racing models are more compact, a lot of them almost looking like if they were blown up, they’d be a futuristic aircraft.

The for now seldom-seen delivery models vary, Amazon being the only ones that really have them for now.

Propeller Configuration

One other thing to look at is the configuration of the propellers. Some models are quadcopters – drones with four propellers. A few two-prop models exist, and several six plus propeller designs are also out there, the latter more to lift very heavy things.

Designs for three-propeller concepts have been thrown around and even prototyped, but these are not presently a common sight. This will likely change.

Lastly, let’s talk about how these propellers are implemented. They all spin on an electric motor, but some have rings around them to protect the edge of a spinning blade, and some don’t. The ones that don’t are much more common. These are troublesome in the fact that they can damage things, pets or people.

Other than these variations, there aren’t that many different kinds of drones, at least not for now. They will diversify as small jet concepts are added to racing models, and lighter weight for more power becomes an increasing reality.

For now, the speed and lift capability of these is limited by how much power they can carry, and how much weight that power adds. Carrying your fuel has always been an annoying compromise source.

What to Look for When Buying a Device

With a this device, it depends on what you want it for, as to the concerns to look into. A racing drone is intended to be fast and maneuverable and should have a good range. Here are a couple of other things to consider.

  • Price – A racing option is more likely to crash than any other, as speed is part of their identity. If you damage this thing, how much will it cost to repair it?
  • Experience – How experienced are you at piloting this device? A racer should not be your first drone, under any circumstances. If you’re experienced at simpler models and are ready to try racing, make sure it’s an affordable and easier-to-handle model. You could only race with those in your skillset with it, but it’s good for teething.
  • How does your community feel about this? There are a lot of people who still aren’t used to things whizzing over their heads in their backyards. Make sure you’re flying this in an area that’s okay with it.

What Are Their Future Applications?

I want really quickly, to talk about where drone racing is going, because I see an interesting sport evolving from this, albeit pricier than this current hobby. Imagine larger models that can fly faster and go further. The racers either use VR, or they have a sit-in control center similar to flight simulators if simplified, and they actually race these devices through an involved obstacle course of some sort.

I’ve read about something like this in some science fiction novel, and now this could actually pretty easily be done. If it proved viable for racing, the next steps for these more professional operated, heavier-duty models would be the delivery of things, the first-responder things, surveying projects, and much more.

TOP-5 Best Racing Drones

Read a review of TOP-5 best products within the price range from $40 to $150. All these devices come with FPV, have 120-degree viewing angle and are compatible with mobile phones. However, they differ in the flight speed, maneuverability, and altitudes they can achieve. Depending on the model, video resolution ranges from 720 to 1080 pixels.

Good Beginner Racing Drone with 720P HD Camera | Holy Stone HS110D 

Racing Drone with 720P HD Camera from Holy Stone: photo

This one isn’t explicitly a racing drone, though it can work for beginner-level races, as it’s a bit more streamlined than other general-purpose models. This one is used by cinematographers, photographers, etc. to get aerial footage.

It’s not the fastest thing in the world, though.

Features

  • Form Factor – Quadcopter. 
  • FPV – Yes.
  • 3D – Yes.
  • Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
  • Transmitter Mode – Yes. 
  • App Mode – Yes.
  • RGB – Possible.
  • Camera Quality – 720p.
  • View Angle – 120 degrees.

Performance

So, this is a general-purpose drone, but one intended to be a bit faster. These are easier to handle than more racing-specific models, making even faster-piloting ideas possible to learn with this much safer device.

This is, of course, excellent for the drone enthusiast who wants to do many things with the device. A downside with it is, due to it wanting to be able to race to an extent, its aerodynamism makes it not very good for modifications.

Pros Cons
  • Easy to fly.
  • Good craftsmanship.
  • Good enough video.
  • Multiple wireless and control modes.
  • Safe for a newcomer.
  • Good for many purposes.
  • Not actually a racing drone per se.
  • A bit pricy. 
  • Can’t really modify them.
  • Can’t really customize them.
  • They can’t really carry anything.

Conclusion 

This is a good one for a beginner, either to drones in general, or to racing. You’re not going to race against some of the others we look at, unless you want to lose, but it’s a good foot in the door. One step at a time.

Holy Stone HS110D: Check the current price

High-Altitude WiFi FPV Racing Drone | SNAPTAIN S5C

High-Altitude WiFi FPV Racing Drone: photo

This one is a good higher-altitude option. Also to its advantage is the fact that it is designed fairly sleek, meaning it can hold its own in a race as well.

Features

  • Form Factor – Quadcopter.
  • FPV – Yes.
  • 3D – Yes.
  • Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
  • Transmitter Mode – Yes.
  • App Mode – Yes.
  • RGB – Possible.
  • Camera Quality – 720p.
  • View Angle – 120 degrees.

Performance

This one’s ultimate achievement is really its maneuverability. It can do rolls and loops and flips, things a lot of drones cannot do. It also can achieve higher altitudes with less strain than some others, due to its construction. That said, in a straight dash, it probably won’t outpace some of the other ones. However, it can out-maneuver them on a whim.

Pros Cons
  • Good craftsmanship.
  • Good enough video.
  • Multiple wireless and control modes.
  • Maneuverable.
  • High-altitude.
  • Very affordable.
  • Still not as fast in a straight dash as some other racing drones.
  • Can’t do much customization to it.

Conclusion 

This one isn’t as fast as some others on a straight vector. However, almost any race is more than just outrunning one another down a hallway. How you move matters just as much. Outmaneuvering and cutting tighter corners, all while doing flips and rolls, is something that’ll make for an exciting race. 

Be careful with your stunts, people. 

SNAPTAIN S5C: Check the current price

High-Def Mid-Range Racing Drone | Holy Stone HS100

High-Def Mid-Range Racing Drone: photo

This is another machine that’s not dedicated to racing, being able to do camera work, or just plain flying around for the fun of it as well.

It has a very good camera on it, compared to many. The 1080P video at 120 degrees gives you a very organic point of view from the sky.

Features

  • Form Factor – Quadcopter.
  • FPV – Yes.
  • 3D – Yes.
  • Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
  • Transmitter Mode – Yes.
  • App Mode – Yes.
  • RGB – Possible.
  • Camera Quality – 1080p.
  • View Angle – 120 degrees.

Performance

This is still kind of a mid-level drone, as racing goes. You’re not out-flying the last two on the list with it. However, it’s pretty maneuverable, allowing it to handle very well. You wouldn’t be bringing this model to a “pro” race anyhow.

Pros Cons
  • Good craftsmanship.
  • Good enough video.
  • Multiple wireless and control modes.
  • Maneuverable.
  • Excellent video.
  • Not going to out-fly the next two.
  • Signal range can be iffy.

Conclusion 

Well, you’re not out-flying some other racing models with this, but you can race others of your skill level with it. This one has multiple purposes like the first one on our list, which is a big selling point for it, too.

Holy Stone HS100: Check the current price

Affordable FPV Drone – Legit Racer | Cheerwing Syma X5SW-V3

Affordable FPV Drone – Legit Racer: photo

This one is actually a legitimate racing model by design but is also intended for exploration and, yes, aerial photography to a lesser extent.

Its ability to make swift climbs and descents, as well as its overall speediness makes this quite a handy little drone for high-speed flying. It’s not as fast as the last one on the list, but few things are.

It’s also fairly easy to pilot.

Features

  • Form Factor – Quadcopter.
  • FPV – Yes.
  • 3D – Yes.
  • Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
  • Transmitter Mode – Yes.
  • App Mode – Yes.
  • RGB – Possible.
  • Camera Quality – 1080p.
  • View Angle – 120 degrees.

Performance 

This one can’t carry anything, which is a shame, I could see some interesting things done if it could. However, it’s pretty quick, it moves smoothly, it rises and falls on a dime, this is a very deft little drone.

Really, there aren’t that many that’re built just with racing in mind, though our next one more or less is.

This is a good option for beginners or people with legit needs for a flying camera. It is, all things said and done, a good drone.

Pros Cons
  • Good craftsmanship.
  • Good enough video.
  • Multiple wireless and control modes.
  • Maneuverable.
  • Excellent video.
  • Can’t carry anything.
  • Still not as fast as thefastest ones.

Conclusion 

I can recommend this item to people where they need a snappier multi-purpose. I can call this a legit racing drone, albeit not a specialty one by any stretch of the imagination.

Cheerwing Syma X5SW-V3: Check the current price

Mini Drone – Serious Racer | SIMREX

Mini Drone – Serious Racer from SIMREX: photo

One thing you notice first of all is how small this item is. It fits in the palm of your hand. The range is limited to Wi-Fi with this one, but for small-circuit actual racing, tiny drones like this are the thing to go for.

The size makes it fast, as does the truncated design of this.

Features

  • Form Factor – Quadcopter.
  • FPV – Yes.
  • 3D – No.
  • Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
  • Transmitter Mode – No.
  • App Mode – Yes.
  • RGB – Possible.
  • Camera Quality – 1080p.
  • View Angle – N/A.

Performance

This tiny unit looks “cute” to some, threatening to some, due to its military-like design. However, it’s really just meant to be a compact model, which if you’re careful, you could even fly indoors.

However, this one is also designed for speed, being very quick, despite its small, affordable design. It’s lightweight which means it doesn’t work hard to lift itself. This does limit the inertia it can pick up, but you don’t want these things to be ballistic.

I am going to be honest. After looking into this one, I am going to get one.

Pros Cons
  • Good craftsmanship.
  • Good enough video.
  • Multiple wireless and control modes.
  • Maneuverable.
  • Excellent video.
  • Can’t carry anything.

Conclusion 

I say this one is gentle and small enough to fly indoors, but please, don’t do this unless you really, really know what you’re doing, and the owner of the property says you can. I’ll be looking a little more into that with a special section at the end of this review. If you want to race, you and your friends should get these. They’re affordable, fast, and ideal.

SIMREX: Check the current price

Comparative Chart of Racing Drone Effectiveness

Product Features

Holy Stone HS110D

FPV – Yes.
3D – Yes.
Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
Transmitter Mode – Yes.
App Mode – Yes.
RGB – Possible.
Camera Quality – 720p.
View Angle – 120 degrees.

Effectiveness: 8

SNAPTAIN S5C

FPV – Yes.
3D – Yes.
Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
Transmitter Mode – Yes.
App Mode – Yes.
RGB – Possible.
Camera Quality – 720p.
View Angle – 120 degrees.

Effectiveness: 8

Holy Stone HS100

FPV – Yes.
3D – Yes.
Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
Transmitter Mode – Yes.
App Mode – Yes.
RGB – Possible.
Camera Quality – 1080p.
View Angle – 120 degrees.

Effectiveness: 9

Cheerwing Syma X5SW-V3

FPV – Yes.
3D – Yes.
Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
Transmitter Mode – Yes.
App Mode – Yes.
RGB – Possible.
Camera Quality – 1080p.
View Angle – 120 degrees.

Effectiveness: 9

SIMREX

FPV – Yes.
3D – No.
Mobile-Compatible – Yes.
Transmitter Mode – No.
App Mode – Yes.
RGB – Possible.
Camera Quality – 1080p.
View Angle – N/A.

Effectiveness: 10

My Personal Experience with Racing Drones

So I’ve never raced drones, but I have talked in the past about having flown a couple. I believe I once mentioned how I had an orange farmer shoot one down. Another one I had, and this is sad to this day, I was flying a little cheap one I paid 25 bucks for, and it pooped out over a backyard I wasn’t even trying to fly over. It fell like a rock, and I heard a shriek and an “oh my god!”.

I go running over there to find out that my drone had dropped right on top of a brand new thing of flowers this poor woman had just planted a moment prior. I apologized profusely to her, I replaced and replanted those flowers for her, and I got my money back from the store where I bought it.

Be careful where you fly these, and always consider what the consequences are, at any second, of it dropping from the air.

Another interesting drone story belongs to both myself and my friend. This one also drives home the consequences of flying these in places you shouldn’t. My buddy and I are kids at heart. On Saturdays, we still goof off at the mall like kids sometimes, playing in the arcade, nosing around in the nerd store, and so on.

One day, at the smarter image, my genius friend bought a small drone. It was nothing amazing, but it wasn’t the cheapest trash out there either. He could not wait to fly this thing. I’d already flown some by that point.

Anyhow, we got to the middle of the mall, which had these really high ceilings with this geometric, solid blue skylight at the top. It had to be 50 feet up to that skylight. There was a big sunken seating area there, lined with plants, and very 80s pastel carpet and seat upholstery.

There I sit, watching the single moms walk by, enjoying my sandwich, not paying any attention to what he’s doing. The next thing I hear is a pop as he closes the battery hatch on the drone. He’d opened it, and set it up. By the time I realized what he was about to do, and could formulate a response, it had already taken off, upward, at relativistic speed.

The crash that occurred as it flew into the skylight was quite loud. It didn’t break the skylight – that stuff was plexiglass. But the device hit it with a mighty, sharp thud, and instantly broke to a million pieces.

Lining the hallways, just above the height where shop signs were, was a lot of neon lighting – another remnant of the 80s. One propeller hit some of it at a tangential angle. It exploded into glass and sparks.

The impact was so severe from hitting the skylight, that an in-ceiling light nearby was jostled too much, and also burst with a shower of sparks.

Pieces of the device rained from above, knocking a tray of coffees a girl was carrying – through the seats as a shortcut – back to her store from a little café not down the mall. She was doused in coffee. Luckily it was all iced coffee.

This was all punctuated by the yelps and squeaks of teenage girls, older people, and small children at the sudden bang, two eruptions of glass/sparks, and the coffee explosion. The lady, for her part, stood there gasping for a moment, before beginning to swear frantically in Korean.

I sat there, facepalming, sighing. Security wasn’t long in arriving. These guys were the size SUVs, I swear they were. They were actually nice because it was more or less an “accident” albeit a stupid as hell accident.

He was banned from the mall for three weeks, he came to a very small settlement with the coffee lady, I think he gave her a couple of hundred bucks plus replaced her clothes. He had to pay for the damages to the mall, and there were signs everywhere after saying “NO DRONES” or something to that effect.

All in all, I don’t think any of those parts, save that piece of propeller, could have hurt anyone, and the damage was superficial. What he did was really stupid, he had to know the mall is not a place to fly your drone, especially your first time flying it. They don’t even let people run in malls, rollerskate/blade, or hell, sit on the floor because of safety laws. How is a drone going to be OK to fly in there?

Now, one last little thing. This last Christmas, I did see drones flying in the mall because our local mall did something really neat and cute. They hung battery-powered light up ornaments from mini models and had them keeping a high altitude, flying around, music coming from some of them. The pilots were very obviously employees disguised as mall loiterers enjoying holiday shopping atmosphere.

But, it was really neat, and I could see that being a more common application of drones in the future. The sky is, literally, the limit with these.

FAQ

Which is the best racing drone?
The Simrex.

Which one is the best for beginners?
First one we looked at.

Can it hover?
Yes.

Do you have to register it?
Not at the moment, at least in the US and EU. That time is probably coming.

How to make a racing drone?
You need a kit or some somewhat advanced knowledge of physics and electronics. There do exist kit series to build custom device in an almost Lego-like way, but you probably don’t want to race those.

Pros & Cons of Using These Products

Pros

  • Somewhat safe form of racing.
  • Promotes the development of technology.
  • Fun hobby.
  • Flying these will be a big industry someday.

Cons

  • Still, have dangers.
  • People still aren’t used to these things.
  • Can be an expensive hobby.

Tips & Life Hacks for Using These Devices

There are a few things you can use these devices for, that people may not always think of. These particular drones may need a little modification for some of these, but still.

  • Use the device to regularly inspect your roof, and after storms or other extreme weather.
  • If you’re renting a room, take aerial photos of the property too.
  • If selling something like a vehicle or a building, use the drone to get some good angles of it, and even fly by a video of it.
  • If a pet escapes, get in the car with someone, have them drive, and use the device for aerial view.
  • If you have a large property, use it to check on things safely. This is especially helpful if you’re temporarily or permanently disabled.
  • Use your drone to get a good aerial view of where you are when hiking, camping or exploring.
  • If you have one that can work safely indoors, you could attach something to it to get cob webs out of ceiling corners or the like.

A Note on the Future

Before I conclude, I want to talk a little bit about the fears people have with drones. This technology is going to be a world-changer in a short period of time, alongside a couple of other big breakthroughs.

That said, we need to assuage people of some concerns about these. The idea, for one, that everyone will spy on their neighbors with one of these is unlikely. It may happen a few times, it’ll make waves, and new laws will be past that’re very enforced, about drones. They will probably require registration.

Another fear, though similar, is that the police or government will patrol all the streets and yards everywhere with these. They will patrol, yes, but they haven’t the time, nor funds to spend spying on private citizens.

Finally, there’s this prevalent terror of these things going wrong. If the computers controlling them make mistakes, have bad data, any number of things. As I said earlier, most of these will be piloted by people, not computers. This will be a big industry, a drone pilot. I can see it now.

For now, everyone needs to get used to these devices. They will be changing the future soon enough.

RTF Vs. Kits

There are two basic categories for drones, above and beyond form factor, control and hardware. That is, RTF and kits. RTF, or ready-to-fly, is a drone that requires little or no assembly before you fly it. Maybe you have to attach a camera and the landing struts, but that’s about it.

Kits, conversely, come in parts that you assemble. These are obviously more customizable as a result. Given that few drones are honed for a specific purpose like high speed flight or the like, being able to alter the build and optimize the design, makes this much more practical to achieve. Does this mean kits are the one right way to go? 

Absolutely not. Honestly, it depends. Are you racing in a custom drone environment? Or, is everyone else using RTF drones? How experienced are you with this kind of thing? Not flying drones themselves, but assembling models and other complex things?

Drones are rarely hard to put together, as their technology is pretty simple on a fundamental level. However, if you’re not at all mechanically inclined, or find this kind of process onerous, then RTF is going to be a more pleasant entry experience for you.

What are the Most Important Racing Drone Characteristics?

So, what should you look for in a racing drone? Most drones seem largely the same – four motor, roughly round or square in shape, lifts and moves via propellers not unlike an easier-to-fly helicopter.

Some drones have more motors – six or eight, with a larger build, that can even carry things. For racing, you have two ultimate goals you want your design to achieve. 

  • Maneuverability. Most drone racing isn’t a linear drag race. They race in circuits, sometimes through an obstacle course. This means you want your drone to be able to bank and turn around and adjust altitude and vector easily.
    Drones, being generally quadcopters, are capable of inversions, hovering, rapid direction change, and much more. They can kind of dart around like a UFO. Optimizing this at higher speeds is important for racing.
  • Speed. Obviously, your other concern is speed. Races are about being faster than competitors, after all. Speed and aerodynamics for drones isn’t quite the same as with an airplane, or with a race car. The bullet-shaped design of those doesn’t work with how drones achieve flight, and how they move.

Still, aerodynamism can be had with them, in their own way. If it kind of looks like it’d be a vehicle if it were bigger, with an obvious front facing component, and a sleeker design, it’s probably more suited for racing.

Weight can also be a fickle thing here, because weight makes acceleration slower, but lack of weight can mean it can’t carry enough inertia to really achieve strong speeds. Lighter-weight drones are also susceptible to wind interference as well.

Buying a Racing Drone Vs. Building It Yourself

This all comes down to you in the end. Buying one means you’re guaranteed something meeting specific specifications, and it requires little to no assembly. It’s easier to get this up and running obviously.

Building it does bring a sense of pride and creative outlet, just as people liking to race custom vehicles. This gives you the ability, if you’re scientifically-inclined, to build and innovate. If you have some circuitry understanding, you can design smarter controls, better cameras, and so on.

However there’s also the joy of creation we mentioned earlier.

What are the Racing Drone Components?

Lastly, let’s look at the basic components of a racing drone. What’re they made of?

  • Frame. The frame is the base structure on which cameras, outer materials, motors and control boards mount to. This is like the chassis of a car. 
  • Flight Controller. Flight controller could refer to two aspects of a drone. The circuitry which controls the drone directly, managing the motors and interfacing with the camera, is sometimes called the controller. 

But it may also refer to the device used to guide and operate the drone – your remote control. Sometimes (better off) if it is a dedicated device, but ones that can be done from a phone exist as apps too.

  • Motors and Blades. Most drones have four motor/blade pairs which spin to produce lift, thrust and guidance.
  • Camera. Not all drones have cameras, but most do.
  • Transponder. This is the signal transponder, either WiFi, RF or both.
  • Battery. A rechargeable, compact, lightweight battery must exist to power the drone.

Drone Racing Tournaments

Drone racing is a fairly new thing, as public use of drones is still a fairly young hobby all around. This means that codified leagues aren’t entirely a thing – leagues, seasons and tournament circuits exist, and the community is pretty unified – but none of these are recognized as regional authorities the way leagues in other competitive sports are.

That said, three of the biggest tournaments are in Vancouver, San Diego, and Madrid, with Madrid being the one where the most competitive, custom drones are raced. This and probably Vancouver will become codified tournaments as the sport becomes a more prevalent “thing”.

Websites such as multigp.com list countless drone races both indoor and outdoor, all over the world, and there are a metric ton of these, just none are as big as the three above, and as said, none of these yet constitute a major league tournament series at this point.

Conclusion

These drones, aside from one, are not dedicated to racing. There aren’t many that are. However, these are designed to be faster than some others, and as a result, you can race them. Everyone should try a cheap model once at least, and the world just needs to embrace this industry, and drive it to evolve and expand.

I am sure one of these will work for you, and if you decide racing isn’t your gig, they rare good for other kinds of fun too.